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Aerial view of forest and farmland in a Pennsylvania watershed
Aerial view of forest and farmland in a Pennsylvania watershed. (Scott Bauer, K5051-8)
Scientists collect runoff samples and review plot layouts in a field
At a Pennsylvania dairy research site, ARS scientists and Penn State collaborators collect ammonia samples and review plot layouts in an LTAR experiment. (Stephen Ausmus, D1856-11)
Grassland-shrub savanna with mountains in background
Grassland-shrub savanna on ARS’s Jornada Experimental Range in New Mexico. (Peggy Greb K11299-1)
USDA technician collects field vegetation samples in 1927
A USDA technician collects vegetation samples in Mandan, North Dakota, in 1927. (USDA-ARS, D3190-1)
ARS scientists collect sensor data at a 100-year-old LTAR site in Beltsville, MD
At a 100-year-old LTAR site in Beltsville, Maryland, scientists review maps and check data from sensors. (Stephen Ausmus, D3857-1)
Herd of cattle walking across a plain
Cattle move toward a windmill on the horizon for a drink of water at an LTAR site in Colorado. (David Augustine, D3858-1)
Cattle in a field
Cattle at the ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Oklahoma. (Ann Marshall, D3854-1)
Aerial view of an LTAR field planted with wheat and canola
Aerial view of an LTAR field planted with wheat and canola. (Dennis Wallin, D3855-1)
Two technicians collect data from a rain gauge
At ARS’s Grazinglands Research Lab in El Reno, Oklahoma, technicians collect data from a rain gauge. (Ann Marshall, D3862-1)
Cows at a system that measures their methane emissions
At the ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Oklahoma, cows visit a system that measures their methane emissions. (Rick Todd, D3856-1)
Cobb Creek in Oklahoma
In Oklahoma, Cobb Creek and its tributaries are part of a watershed ARS is studying to gauge the effects of agricultural conservation practices on water quality. (Sherwood Mcintyre, D575-1)
Training pack mules in 1942
During World War II, Fort Reno supplied horses and mules for the military. (Historic Fort Reno Inc., D3851-1)
1880 historical photo of U.S. Army soldiers and Indian Scouts
U.S. Army soldiers and Indian Scouts 1880. Fort Reno was instrumental in keeping peace among Indian groups by combatting the illegal invasion of land-hungry settlers into parts of Oklahoma territory. (Historic Fort Reno Inc., D3848-1)
1900s photo of soldier on a horse jumping a fence
Cavalry training at Fort Reno in the 1900s. (Historic Fort Reno Inc., D3850-1)
Cavalry stables at Fort Reno in early 1900s
Cavalry stables, early 1900s. In 1908, Congress established Fort Reno as a remount depot, where mules and horses were bred and trained for the U.S. Cavalry and our allies. (U.S. Cavalry Association and Museum, D3849-1)
German POW camp Fort Reno in 1943
In 1943, Fort Reno became a prisoner-of-war camp where several hundred German prisoners were held. (Historic Fort Reno Inc., D3852-1)
A variety of flowers and grasses growing on a prairie
Preserving and increasing the variety of plants on pastures is one goal of LTAR research at the Central Plains Experimental Range in Colorado. (Mary Ashby, D3845-1)
Cattle fitted with global positioning system (GPS) collars
At the Central Plains Experimental Range in northeastern Colorado, cattle were fitted with global positioning system (GPS) collars to track their grazing behavior and pasture use. (Peggy Greb, D2106-1)
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